Monday, May 25, 2009

Just Ask!

Want an opportunity to ask a question about Law Enforcement? Have a traffic related question? How about something you always wanted to ask an Officer but never have had the chance to do it?

Click on the comments below and submit your question. If you wish to remain anonymous, that is fine. All comments/questions must be "approved" before posting. This will help prevent duplicate or inappropriate submissions.

Depending on the topic, we may address the question in a separate topic or as a reply comment. We will make every effort to address all questions that come in. So don't be shy, just ask!

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

What is meant when an officer says they are out on a bo vehicle or something similar to that saying?

APOA Voice said...

The term "B.O." refers to something in "bad order" or "not working". You may also hear them say "909T" which is a radio code for "traffic hazard."

Anonymous said...

Do you have a list of codes that might be heard when listening to APD? i often do and some of the codes found at ACPO's website and other radio sites dont always correspond with APD...

Also, what radios does Arcadia PD currently use in thier patrol units and portable radios?

I heard from someone that APD always monitors MPD.. What do they use to do that since APD has UHF radios.. Scanners?

APOA Voice said...

Give me a day or so and I will toss a post up with the info...

Anonymous said...

At an intersection where there is a left turn light, sometimes it says left turn on left signal only, sometimes that wording is not included. If it is not included, is it legal to make a left turn (assuming there is no oncoming traffic) even if the left turn signal is not lit?

APOA Voice said...

If there is a dedicated left turn signal, you must follow those lights. Usually, you would be facing a solid red/green arrow only, in a dedicated left turn lane. The signs may have language that restrict the turn to only when the green arrow is lighted. Some signals are set-up to only light a green arrow when there is traffic demand in that lane, such as E/B and W/B Huntington at Santa Anita. That type of signal allows either a protected left turn with a green arrow or a left turn as traffic permits on a solid green. Each intersection is unique and may have variations of signals configurations.